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Q

hammad22 asked:

Do you know how many people will go into the job field of programming and how much that field will grow into the future?

A

This sums it up! Check out more stats here.

These tweets are making our day

This done selfie is pretty amazing (via thisistheverge)

Q

prometheus-theoverlord asked:

Okay, just a little question... is there a website or somewhere that can explain different languages for begginers? I've always wanted to start, but I just don't know where.

A

http://www.bentobox.io is a cool resource that gives you a rundown of most programming languages.
When you’re ready to start learning, check out http://code.org/learn. There are links to tons of free, online tutorials for beginners. I recommend starting with JavaScript, the most widely applicable language. Python is another fun first language. 
Just try out the basics and you’ll see it’s a lot of fun! Then you can keep building on what you learn. 

SOTW: Best computer science invention ever? “Autocorrect.”

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Milena Marchan
7th grade
Chicago, IL

Milena’s story is especially inspiring because she was born without one arm, from the elbow down. This is only to say, most of her peers never even notice, as she whizzes through puzzles and problems, and has “embraced coding like no other.”

Milena’s art teacher — who incorporates activities from Scratch, Code.org and others into her class — says her code is creative, complicated and challenging. The 7th grader “raised the bar in the classroom. She’s inspired many students to try to do better.”

Whats the best computer science invention ever?
It sounds weird but, autocorrect. It’s my favorite because I’m always making mistakes and now computers can automatically correct them for me!

Where do you want your code skills to take you?
I would like to do something in the medical field, like be a physician or surgeon.

What would you tell other kids who think computer science might not be for them?
If you are not into it because you think it’s hard, that not true. Before I tried it, I thought there would be a whole lot more to learn than there actually was. It can be really, really simple.

We’re sharing this story as part of our new Student of the Week series. Kids in cities and towns around the world who are changing the face of computer science. Do you teach a rockstar student? Nominate them to be a Code.org Student of the Week.

“Seeing the delight on the faces of the kids and parents, we realized this is a vast untapped need. It was mind-boggling in that literally 100 percent of people said they wanted continuing programs.”
— a California teacher on the Hour of Code.

SOTW: “Girls should code because they are just as good as boys!”

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Mimi
4th grade
Houston, TX

Mimi says she had only heard a “teeny” bit about code until her teacher recently introduced computer programming. As Mimi’s classmates were still making shapes and letters with Scratch, she put in extra hours at home every day to build an entire video game with 10 levels. Now, she’s on a roll.

“Coding is fun and useful. You can learn how to fix your computer if something goes wrong. You can create and learn new things.”

What would you tell other girls?
Girls should code too because they are just as good as boys!

What’s down the line?
When I grow up, I think I’ll be able to do lots more on computers and that they will be even smaller. I want to be an artist, programmer, some kind of doctor. In that order.

We’re sharing this story as part of our new Student of the Week series. Kids in cities and towns around the world who are changing the face of computer science. Do you teach a rockstar student? Nominate them to be a Code.org Student of the Week.

Scientists can now create accurate mugshots using only DNA

Happy 10th birthday, Gmail! 

"Hey, girl. I want to help you practice computational thinking."

(LOL, this drag-and-drop app is almost like our Hour of Code tutorial, but you get to program Ryan Gosling!)