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“Education is about preparing kids for life, and public education is about helping people have equal opportunity, helping those who don’t have as much money have a more level playing field.”
— Code.org co-founder Ali Partovi on why every school should offer computer science

Words to live by today

Words to live by today

Piece of paper slash self-folding transformer robot

Our founder Hadi’s ice bucket challenge. On a surfboard.

We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall! We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall! We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall! We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall! We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall!

We just wrapped up a week of training 60+ Chicago teachers to bring computer science to their schools this fall!

Even 12-year-olds on summer break can make a game like Flappy Bird! 
Check out the startup training their parents put them through.
via techcrunch

Even 12-year-olds on summer break can make a game like Flappy Bird! 

Check out the startup training their parents put them through.

via techcrunch

Student of the Week: “Computer science might be the most valuable tool you ever have”

image

Courtney Thurston
11th grade
Harrisburg, PN

Ah, summertime, when high schoolers work on autonomous cargo-delivery or search-and-rescue systems for the Navy, right? Okay, maybe just if you’re this Student of the Month.

At 16, Courtney helps lead ProjectCSGIRLS, the largest computer science competition for middle school girls in the country and co-founded a startup that connects underserved high schoolers with tech mentors. In her spare time, she’s putting her school’s Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science curriculum onto codecademy so her peers can get instant feedback on assignments. Pretty cool!

Tell us more about your startup, Magikstra.
I co-founded Magikstra with a fellow National Winner of the NCWIT’s Aspirations in Computing Award, Ananya. We found it difficult to connect with mentors throughout our high school years and know that underserved communities benefit enormously from the kind of mentorship we both received through NCIWT. There was no dedicated platform for this so that’s what we’re working on.

What’s next for you?
I’m really interested in the development of reusable rockets. There’s a huge computer science effort going into these sorts of projects and I’m convinced automation is the future. Autonomous systems are, in large part, demonstrably safer than manned ones.

Why should more girls learn computer science?
I think tech should be representative of its users. It’s as simple as that. If we’re not actually representing user culture, we’re not actually meeting the needs of humanity.

Any tips for other girls?
You don’t have to be fantastic at math. You don’t have to be in love with data structures and algorithms. You don’t have to sit behind a computer and code all day. You don’t have to do any of these — and other stereotypical stuff — if you don’t want to. Computer science is a tool. It might be the most valuable tool you ever have. Apply it to the things you love.

We’re sharing this story as part of our new Student of the Week series. Kids in cities and towns around the world who are changing the face of computer science. Do you teach a rockstar student? Nominate them to be a Code.org Student of the Week.

This is what Microsoft’s website looked like in 1994.
20 years ago, some browsers didn’t even support images!
via thisistheverge

This is what Microsoft’s website looked like in 1994.

20 years ago, some browsers didn’t even support images!

via thisistheverge

We just passed 40 MILLION students who have tried the Hour Of Code! Thank you! 

This month, we’ll be training 100 Code.org Affiliates to bring computer science workshops to elementary school teachers nationwide. Today is our trial run!

This month, we’ll be training 100 Code.org Affiliates to bring computer science workshops to elementary school teachers nationwide. Today is our trial run!

Consider yourself warned!
That bag of chips you just ate can tell all your secrets, thanks to software that translates invisible vibrations.
The deets Consider yourself warned!
That bag of chips you just ate can tell all your secrets, thanks to software that translates invisible vibrations.
The deets

Consider yourself warned!

That bag of chips you just ate can tell all your secrets, thanks to software that translates invisible vibrations.

The deets

fastcompany:

Susan Wojcicki built Google into a $55 billion advertising giant. Now she’s running YouTube. Her job: Do it again.
Her skills as a leader and operator are going to be tested at YouTube like they never were during her 15-year career at Google.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Susan Wojcicki built Google into a $55 billion advertising giant. Now she’s running YouTube. Her job: Do it again.

Her skills as a leader and operator are going to be tested at YouTube like they never were during her 15-year career at Google.

Read More>

Computer science now has the leading education bill in Congress! Our VP of Government Affairs Cameron wasn’t in the office but we just had to have him ring in the celebrations. (at Code.org)

Computer science has the leading education bill in Congress

imageJust as Congress goes on summer break, the Computer Science Education Act (HR 2536) won its 100th supporter! With over 100 cosponsors and an even mix of Democrats and Republicans, this bill is now the most broadly cosponsored education bill in the House. Even in a polarized Congress, computer science education has momentum and bipartisan backing.

Introduced by Representatives Susan Brooks (R-IN) and Jared Polis (D-CO), the Computer Science Education Act removes barriers that make it harder for states to use Federal funding for computer science education. Simply put, the bill clarifies that federal programs can fund computer science programs and can support local educators who want to put computer science in our schools. The bill is cost-neutral and doesn’t introduce new programs or mandates.

We’re very thankful for the leadership of Representatives Brooks and Polis and their unwavering support of computer science. And for the efforts of the Computing in the Core coalition of companies and nonprofits that have supported this legislation.

At Code.org, our goal is to leverage this momentum and tell Congress to pass House and Senate versions of this legislation when they return to session September. While we’re celebrating this milestone, we still need more supporters in Congress, so please tell your Members of Congress to join the movement building around computer science education.

Cameron Wilson
COO and head of Government Affairs, Code.org